PANIC, POLITICAL CORRECTNESS AND THE EROSION OF TRUST IN AUTHORITY

PANIC, POLITICAL CORRECTNESS AND THE EROSION OF TRUST IN AUTHORITY

Over the past few years, the medium of podcasting has really come into its own; we are all now able to access quality programmes, with high production values on a myriad of subjects; the technology to record a professional sounding show has now become so cheap that anyone with an idea is now able to broadcast.

One of the more popular genres is the true crime documentary, with high profile series such as Sword And Scale, Casefile and Criminal gaining a wide audience and commercial sponsorship for their often confronting exposé style presentations of the most shocking murders and sex crimes from across the English speaking world.

A recent podcast, Atlanta Monster, examines in depth the case of Wayne Williams and the Atlanta child murders; we will not go too deeply into the details of the case on this blog, however, the writers and researchers of this series have done an excellent job of describing the fear and paranoia which gripped the city in the late 1970’s.

Between 1979 and 1981 it is alleged that a lone serial killer murdered as many as 28 Negro children, teenagers and adults, slipping in and out of the housing projects and inner-city ghettoes to abduct people then dumping his victims in semi-rural areas, often in the Chattahoochee River.

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Wayne Williams (centre) was convicted of killing two men and is suspected of murdering as many as 26 other Black men and boys

Black music promoter and Atlanta native Wayne Williams, 23, was ultimately convicted of the murders of two of the adult victims and is presumed to be responsible for all the crimes in the series, though there is reasonable doubt over his guilt in those matters and skepticism even among the families of the 26 other victims as to Williams’ culpability in the death of their loved ones.

What is interesting to us, however, is the effect that this wave of brutality had upon a multiracial society and the extremely negative impacts of rumour, race-baiting and politically correct disinformation on the part of civic and community authority figures.

The rumours of a White plot to exterminate black youth persist to this day, this is in spite of the conviction of Williams and even though credible testimony implicating a gang of black homosexuals in the abuse and possible abductions of many of the dead boys has come to light, the passage of 40 years has also done little to restore the faith of Black Atlantans in their Police and municipal officials.

The disappearances of so many Black youngsters naturally spurred race hucksters and troublemakers into action, rumours of Ku Klux Klan terrorism began to take hold, which set the nerves of White citizens and city authorities on edge; the city seemed to be edging toward widespread rioting of the sort seen in Detroit and Chicago only a decade earlier.

Despite the expert opinion of both local Police and FBI behavioural analysts that the killer was almost certainly a black man the rumours and paranoia took hold, with community leaders and officials unable to dissuade some from propagating the view that the murders were a racist plot; the damage was done and mishandling of some aspects of the case by law enforcement led to a breakdown in trust between citizens and the Police.

The rumours of a White plot to exterminate black youth persist to this day, this is in spite of the conviction of Williams and even though credible testimony implicating a gang of black homosexuals in the abuse and possible abductions of many of the dead boys has come to light, the passage of 40 years has also done little to restore the faith of black Atlantans in their Police and municipal officials.

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Rumours of KKK involvement in The Bowen Homes Daycare disaster in 1980 further eroded race relations in Atlanta

One striking example of the effect that this breakdown in trust had was the response to another tragic event in 1980 at the height of the child murders panic: the Bowen Homes Daycare Centre explosion, in which a poorly maintained, gas fired boiler exploded, killing five Black children and two adults.

Bystanders and race hustling community leaders immediately jumped to the conclusion that the explosion had been the result of a KKK terrorist bomb and an escalation of the rumoured racist war on black boys, by this stage relations between the Negro community and authorities were so strained that many in the crowd could not be reasoned with and a riot was narrowly avoided.

The Indian media went berserk with allegations of a racist motive behind the attacks, egged on by Australia’s self-hating White press corps the situation began to spiral out of control, with ALP linked race baiters and ethnic community stooges agreeing, without evidence, that the violence against Indians was a White problem.

We use these points as an illustration of what can happen when a government and law enforcement authorities mishandle a crisis and the dire results upon social cohesion of equivocation, or deliberate misinformation by officials and offer a warning regarding the present situation in Australia.

Casting our minds back to 2009 we recall the Indian immigrant crisis in which a fairly large number of students, workers or migrants from the sub-continent were mugged, seriously assaulted and, in at least three cases, stabbed to death during robberies.

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Indians rally in Melbourne, rumours of racist attacks by Whites fuelled the hysteria

The Indian media went berserk with allegations of a racist motive behind the attacks, egged on by Australia’s self-hating White press corps the situation began to spiral out of control, with ALP linked race baiters and ethnic community stooges agreeing, without evidence, that the violence against Indians was a White problem.

It turned out that many of the episodes of violence were either fabricated to cover up other misbehaviour by Indians, intra-ethnic trouble between migrants, the depredations of drug addicts or racially motivated gang activity by Pacific Islander, Sudanese or Arab youths.

We are not suggesting that no Whites at all were involved, only that the allegations of White racism had no foundation and the considerable unrest these rumours caused, including several large and raucous protest marches and revenge attacks against innocent Whites could have been avoided had the Police, media and state government behaved responsibly in the first place.

What we saw from Chief Commissioner of Police Simon Overland and Premier Ted Baillieu were the worst examples of political correctness and outright misinformation concerning ethnic crime, both all but agreeing that racism was a serious problem and proffering the utterly false assertion that crime was rare among immigrants.

When a Sudanese youth can go unpunished after kicking a policeman full in the face as he is kneeling, defenceless over a prone shoplifting suspect then that gives a green light to every badly socialised miscreant and predatory suburban bludger that it is open season on ordinary people, after all, in their minds nobody is going to stop them and no judge convict.

The official position was blown out of the water by events on the ground, the rampant criminality of many Indians and the conviction of a number of both White and non-White criminals for the muggings, murders and assaults; the resolution came not with a greater effort from Police but a tightening of visa rules for international students and workers, the problem abated to a manageable level within months of the change.

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Sudanese spokesman Richard Deng, his shameless shilling for the Andrews ALP regime greatly diminishes his credibility

As a result confidence in Police and politicians on the matter of community safety nosedived, Victorians no longer trusted the authorities to tell the truth about crime, especially when the perpetrators were immigrants or people of colour; this has had a devastating effect upon community morale and social cohesion in Melbourne particularly in the migrant-heavy, crime-prone outer suburbs.

Flash forward to 2018 and the latest moral panic in Melbourne is the African gang crisis, which when compared to the Indian crisis of a decade ago is orders of magnitude worse and, in fact, has probably accounted for many times the number of Indian victims than the original series of crimes.

Trust in the Victorian authorities, particularly the police and judiciary, is at an all-time low, Chief Commissioner Graham Ashton and Premier Daniel Andrews have doubled down the politically correct disinformation, radically ramped up the grooming of ALP stooges in the African milieux and done nothing to tackle the widespread, and wholly justified, view that Sudanese criminals are given lenient treatment simply due to the anti-racist views of judges and politicians.

When a Sudanese youth can go unpunished after kicking a policeman full in the face as he is kneeling, defenceless over a prone shoplifting suspect then that gives a green light to every badly socialised miscreant and predatory suburban bludger that it is open season on ordinary people, after all, in their minds nobody is going to stop them and no judge convict.

Do not misread our intentions in writing this piece, we are no fans of Victoria Police or the current globalist criminal elite exemplified by the Andrews ALP regime; as far as we are concerned they are reaping what their predecessors have sown and the further down they slip in the esteem of worker the better.

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Arnav Sati of Tarneit, another multicultural demagogue with his own agenda petitioned the state for a clampdown on youth, ie African crime

We merely point out that once the spell is broken, once the powers that be have told one too many self serving lies about community security the social contract in which we give away the monopoly on the use of force to the state is rendered null and void; while ordinary workers will carry on as normal for the most part the rise of ethnic demagogues and the spread of pernicious, unreliable information and rumour will be the norm.

The lessons from Atlanta, the Indian student crisis and the African gang outrage are that if rumours are not tackled and cowardly political correctness gives rise to outright dishonesty on the part of officials then social cohesion quickly evaporates; once eroded the trust between citizens and state, it appears, is almost impossible to repair.

Criminals and fanatics, sensing a power vacuum, will always take over the dialogue between people and state when trust in authority is gone and these attitudes become so entrenched and the “racism” disinformation stories so deeply embedded in local folklore that lies eventually eclipse the truth.

Even under the heel of the globalists there is, as yet, no reason to think that community relations in Melbourne will deteriorate to the level of Atlanta, or other big American cities; however re-orienting the relationship between citizen and state to rest on lies, re-affirming existing prejudices and spreading misinformation certainly sets us on the road to similar levels of discord and violence.

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Atlanta riots, 1966, part of a continuum of poorly managed racial incidents