According to Opposition Leader Bill Shorten, “Putin should not be admired by anyone”. This stern warning which is backed with all the authority of a man lecturing his wife’s son comes in response to Pauline Hanson’s latest appraisal of the Russian leader.

Confident that Hanson hasn’t the foggiest outside the whispered instructions of James Ashby and Malcolm Roberts, we’re putting this down to another excruciating attempt to accrue relevance vis-à-vis, foreign demagogues.

Similarly, the Trump phenomenon – which we’ve recently decried as a fraudulent ploy to deceive White Identitarians into supporting Trumpism – is also a go-to man for a Hanson covering up her party’s internal entropy.

Far from an exclusive happening to our own shores, it’s this two-man show that reveals itself all around the civic world with the same annoying recurrence as an accursed fly on a hot day.

It comes to us always in the same package: “we want a strong leader like Putin,” “we want Putin’s style of leadership,” “we need someone like Trump,” “Trump is a strong leader,” and too many ghastly variants thereof.

It’s remarkable that this one, quite broad and yet at the same time quite simplified quality of strength, is presented in such a fashion as though it’s an exotic viand to be searched out and acquired by adventurous merchants, brought back to us in all haste so we can sup of this ‘strength’ and ‘strong governance’.

Also remarkable, is that the actual political considerations between the two leaders and goals of their respective countries – which are manifestly at odds in many areas – are so blatantly ignored which hazes the proper definition of what the Hansonites and associated

Also remarkable, is that the actual political considerations between the two leaders and goals of their respective countries – which are manifestly at odds in many areas – are so blatantly ignored which hazes the proper definition of what the Hansonites and associated

It comes to us always in the same package: “we want a strong leader like Putin,” “we want Putin’s style of leadership,” “we need someone like Trump,” “Trump is a strong leader,” and too many ghastly variants thereof.

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A strong leader? Yep, that’s me!

It’s remarkable that this one, quite broad and yet at the same time quite simplified quality of strength, is presented in such a fashion as though it’s an exotic viand to be searched out and acquired by adventurous merchants, brought back to us in all haste so we can sup of this ‘strength’ and ‘strong governance’.

It’s likewise remarkable that the actual political considerations between the two leaders and goals of their respective countries – which are manifestly at odds in many areas – are so blatantly ignored which hazes the proper definition of what the Hansonites and associated

It’s remarkable too that the actual political considerations between the two leaders and goals of their respective countries – which are manifestly at odds in many areas – are so blatantly ignored which hazes the proper definition of what the Hansonites and associated fiends are even after anymore. As the spud fields aren’t known for producing Machiavellians, we would save these civic patriots the trouble of questing after that which they won’t acquire by recommending some essential reading in the form of Roger Hargreaves’

It comes to us always in the same package: “we want a strong leader like Putin,” “we want Putin’s style of leadership,” “we need someone like Trump,” “Trump is a strong leader,” and too many ghastly variants thereof.

As the spud fields aren’t known for producing Machiavellians, we would save these civic patriots the trouble of questing after that which they won’t acquire by recommending some essential reading in the form of Roger Hargreaves’ Mr. Strong, supplemented by Mr. Clever; the teachings are simply codified and full of quaint illustrations – imagine the infused wisdom the flag-wavers could learn from these benevolent characters.

Nevertheless, it’s perplexing as to why we want or even need a leader like Trump or Putin. You can’t have a leader like them without mimicking them in some way or another, and you can’t mimic them without looking like a total dill.

Surely a ‘strong’ leader does not mimic, but acts from his own competent self; and surely if one did have that competency of leadership they would act on it and not be asking where it is or why we don’t have it, much less trying to cheaply copy and paste it from overseas. Hanson’s bellowing for such leaders while not matching them on any level is likely as close a personal confession we’ll get that she positively doesn’t have in her what the people think she does.

Surely a ‘strong’ leader does not mimic, but acts from his own competent self; and surely if one did have that competency of leadership they would act on it and not be asking where it is or why we don’t have it, much less trying to cheaply copy and paste it from overseas. Hanson’s bellowing for such leaders while not matching them on any level is likely as close a personal confession we’ll get that she positively doesn’t have in her what the people think she does.

That’s why the sickly obsession with these men, personality envy if you will, is so rampant: the allure of foreign rulers make up for everything our own equivalents lack; it’s a dazzling show to trick the masses. That Hanson’s goons post images of her everywhere with the appropriated slogan “Make Australia Great Again” shows the authority is borrowed and tied to offshore markets – again, mimicking.

Nevertheless, it’s perplexing as to why we want or even need a leader like Trump or Putin. You can’t have a leader like them without mimicking them in some way or another, and you can’t mimic them without looking like a total dill.

But when something is over exaggerated these patriots will never cease to amaze us by under exaggerating, if not flat out ignoring, other events that strike anyone else as rather important. A prominent case in point being Putin’s crucial intervention in the Syrian Civil War. It’s in this Arab country that otherwise vocal Putinophiles are quieter than the Russian President’s critics.

Yes, they appear to keep mum over the fact Russia has cosy relations with Ba’athist Syria and, worse on the patriot Richter scale, Iran. Now, what does that mean? It means that outside theatrics, patriots know and care about their idols as much as Dan Evans knows and cares about being sober.

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Pauline Hanson, super-nationalist!

The extent of Russia’s cordial relations with the Islamic world (part of it at any rate) is hardly a minor matter, yet here we are scratching our heads as to why Putin isn’t persona non grata to those drooling over his perceived magnificence. His choice in international friends is a little halal, no?

That Hanson’s goons post images of her everywhere with the appropriated slogan “Make Australia Great Again” shows the authority is borrowed and tied to offshore markets – again, mimicking. But when something is over exaggerated these patriots will never cease to amaze us by under exaggerating, if not flat out ignoring, other events that strike anyone else as rather important.

A prominent case in point being Putin’s crucial intervention in the Syrian Civil War. It’s in this Arab country that otherwise vocal Putinophiles are quieter than the Russian President’s critics. Yes, they appear to keep mum over the fact Russia has cosy relations with Ba’athist Syria and, worse on the patriot Richter scale, Iran.

Yes, they appear to keep mum over the fact Russia has cosy relations with Ba’athist Syria and, worse on the patriot Richter scale, Iran. Now, what does that mean? It means that outside theatrics, patriots know and care about their idols as much as Dan Evans knows and cares about being sober.

Now, what does that mean? It means that outside theatrics, patriots know and care about their idols as much as Dan Evans knows and cares about being sober. The extent of Russia’s cordial relations with the Islamic world (part of it at any rate) is hardly a minor matter, yet here we are scratching our heads as to why Putin isn’t persona non grata to those drooling over his perceived magnificence. His choice in international friends is a little halal, no?

A prominent case in point being Putin’s crucial intervention in the Syrian Civil War. It’s in this Arab country that otherwise vocal Putinophiles are quieter than the Russian President’s critics. Yes, they appear to keep mum over the fact Russia has cosy relations with Ba’athist Syria and, worse on the patriot Richter scale, Iran.

Now, what does that mean? It means that outside theatrics, patriots know and care about their idols as much as Dan Evans knows and cares about being sober. The extent of Russia’s cordial relations with the Islamic world (part of it at any rate) is hardly a minor matter, yet here we are scratching our heads as to why Putin isn’t persona non grata to those drooling over his perceived magnificence. His choice in international friends is a little halal, no?

Now, what does that mean? It means that outside theatrics, patriots know and care about their idols as much as Dan Evans knows and cares about being sober. The extent of Russia’s cordial relations with the Islamic world (part of it at any rate) is hardly a minor matter, yet here we are scratching our heads as to why Putin isn’t persona non grata to those drooling over his perceived magnificence. His choice in international friends is a little halal, no?

The fatal flaw in Australian populism is that it can’t grow an organic, incorruptible base. Instead, we’ve shown to be inundated with scoundrels, hacks and, probably most insulting to the people, opportunists. As the nativism gives way to popularity and egoism so do the tenets of pure Nationalism. Populism co-opts its way into the established order of things and, lo and behold, we have but a different shade of globalism. Hanson’s own economic and immigration policies attest to that.

Nationalists hope the lesson is slowly sinking in that any so-called ‘saviour of the people’ placing too much attachment in foreign politics is more than likely not too sure about their own individualistic capabilities back home.

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Dan “the conservative capitalist” Evans (R) and the biggest grub on the Internet (L)
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